Pizza Dough

Once upon a time, I would want to make pizza and if the weather was nasty out, I’d just forget about it because the bakery was so far away. Despite the fact that I’d spent most of my life making homemade bread, it didn’t occur to me that pizza dough doesn’t require as much time and work.

You can mix this up and use it immediately, but I prefer to let it sit for at least an hour in the oven with the light on before stretching the dough.

Pizza Dough Stretched
Pizza Dough, Stretched

You can vary the amounts of flour, which will give you different textures and degrees of pliability. This recipe is easy to stretch while in the pan, simply plopping the ball of dough in the pan and then pulling it like taffy (for those that remember this) to the edges of the pan. It’s a very good texture for making a thin crust and gooey enough that if you make a tear, you can easily break off a piece from a thicker part and use it as a patch. It will heal itself quickly if placed across the tear.

Increasing  flour to 3 cups will give you a dough that could work if you want to try your hand at stretching it by tossing above your head.

If you have never done this before though, I recommend practicing your flips with a wet towel first to get the technique, and then making  extra dough in case something goes wrong. A fun trick to master though, and I fondly remember my time as a pizza cook in the West End of Vancouver in my teens.

Pizza With Sauce
Pizza With Sauce

As long as you don’t drop it on the floor, you should be able to get something out of it. As this dough is tender, it is best to use a thin sauce, rather than  a thick one. I tend to thin mine with olive oil.

 

Pizza Toppings
Pizza Toppings

When it comes to topping the pizza, I find that it works best to chop all the ingredient to the sizes that I like best for each and then mix all together in a bowl before topping the pizza. You get better distribution this way than by individually placing items on the dough, which relatively speaking

No Knead Sourdough Bread

This is dead easy and makes great  bread!

Our simple instructions for the  Sourdough Yeast Culture can be found at this link.

As to the flour used, this is mainly a white bread recipe, but I often use a combination of 2cups white, 1cup whole wheat, and 1/2 cup flax meal.

Also, ideally one would use  “Hard Wheat” flour, but All Purpose will work. For specialty flours, one can often find these in bulk food stores, especially the “health food store” variety, and also in gourmet shops.

The original instructions call for a dutch oven, but I currently don’t have one, so used a  ceramic casserole dish. I also used a pyrex casserole, but it broke, so I don’t recommend them for this.  The temperature shift between the hot casserole and the room temperature bread is almost certainly the culprit.

Gluten free brioche

A box of Brioche for family dinner
A box of Brioche for a holiday dinner

There is a big love for this bread…! How much I love the beautiful aromas of brioche while are baking,and my little daughter stuck her cute little face in the oven waiting for them to be bake…!Nice,fluffy,buttery,not very sweet,scented with the vanilla and the orange! Perfect for the fall,bake them and offer them as a gift,like I did with mine!

It may look a big and long process,but is very very easy to make!