Tag Archives: Glen Synoground Photo

No Knead Sourdough Bread

This is dead easy and makes great  bread!

Our simple instructions for the  Sourdough Yeast Culture can be found at this link.

As to the flour used, this is mainly a white bread recipe, but I often use a combination of 2cups white, 1cup whole wheat, and 1/2 cup flax meal.

Also, ideally one would use  “Hard Wheat” flour, but All Purpose will work. For specialty flours, one can often find these in bulk food stores, especially the “health food store” variety, and also in gourmet shops.

The original instructions call for a dutch oven, but I currently don’t have one, so used a  ceramic casserole dish. I also used a pyrex casserole, but it broke, so I don’t recommend them for this.  The temperature shift between the hot casserole and the room temperature bread is almost certainly the culprit.

November – Eatin’s Canada

Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup
Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup

November is the first of the truly cold months throughout The Great White North, and so it’s all about Bread and Soup for us here at Eatin’s Canada.  We’re featuring recipes for both, and a review about Enoteca Sociale,  in Toronto, along with an interview with Holger,  their Bread Baker and Pasta Maker, and a recipe for Enoteca Sociale’s Rosemary  Foccacia.

We have a Roasted Vegetable & Polenta Soup recipe from Glen Synoground, and many soup recipes from Bill Wimberly, beginning with his recipes for Basic Chicken Broth and Stock Variations about the differences between Broth and Stock.

Heart of Bread
We LOVE bread!

We also have recipes for some of my favourite bread recipes. One is from the Purity Flour Cookbook recipe for White Bread (with variations for 60% whole wheat), which was the first that I ever used when making my first loaves at the age of 10. This recipe was also featured in other popular flour company  cookbooks of the time. Also, Phyllis’s Bread, and Sunflower Bread from The Deaf Smith Country Cookbook, by Marjorie Winn Ford, Susan Hillyard, and Mary Faulk Koock, of Texas. A wonderful bread and a favourite cookbook…now sadly, out of print, but available online. Finally, we have instructions for Trapping and feeding Wild Sourdough Yeast.

Bill Wimberly in the army
Bill Wimberly in the army

A bit more about Bill Wimberly…he was a corporate chef, a good friend to me as a blogger,  and a wonderful and thoughtful man.

Sadly, we lost Bill  to Cancer shortly after this site was built, but it was created in part with him in mind.

Bill began cooking while in the service as a young man, and then went onto chef school to study formally on The GI Bill. When we first “met”  online in 2007, Bill was a semi-retired corporate chef and one of my best advisors in recipe development.  He is our patron saint, not unlike St. Vincent, and dearly missed.

We’ll post as many of his excellent recipes as possible.

Eatin’s Canada – November

Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup
Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup

November is the first of the truly cold months throughout The Great White North, and so it’s all about Bread and Soup for us here at Eatin’s Canada.  We’re featuring recipes for both, and a review about Enoteca Sociale,  in Toronto, along with an interview with Holger,  their Bread Baker and Pasta Maker, and a recipe for Enoteca Sociale’s Rosemary  Foccacia.

We have a Roasted Vegetable & Polenta Soup recipe from Glen Synoground, and many soup recipes from Bill Wimberly, beginning with his recipes for Basic Chicken Broth and Stock Variations about the differences between Broth and Stock.

Heart of Bread
We LOVE bread!

We also have recipes for some of my favourite bread recipes. One is from the Purity Flour Cookbook recipe for White Bread (with variations for 60% whole wheat), which was the first that I ever used when making my first loaves at the age of 10. This recipe was also featured in other popular flour company  cookbooks of the time. Also, Phyllis’s Bread, and Sunflower Bread from The Deaf Smith Country Cookbook, by Marjorie Winn Ford, Susan Hillyard, and Mary Faulk Koock, of Texas. A wonderful bread and a favourite cookbook…now sadly, out of print, but available online. Finally, we have instructions for Trapping and feeding Wild Sourdough Yeast.

Bill Wimberly in the army
Bill Wimberly in the army

A bit more about Bill Wimberly…he was a corporate chef, a good friend to me as a blogger,  and a wonderful and thoughtful man.

Sadly, we lost Bill  to Cancer shortly after this site was built, but it was created in part with him in mind.

Bill began cooking while in the service as a young man, and then went onto chef school to study formally on The GI Bill. When we first “met”  online in 2007, Bill was a semi-retired corporate chef and one of my best advisors in recipe development.  He is our patron saint, not unlike St. Vincent, and dearly missed.

We’ll post as many of his excellent recipes as possible.

Roasted Vegetable and Polenta Soup

Recipe and photographs by Glen Synoground

RawVeggiesThe types of vegetables you use, and their relative amounts are variable, and can be based on the vegetables you have available, and want to use. What matters is that you have more or less 5 cups of mixed vegetables to begin with.

Starting with onions and garlic is always a good place, and certain types of vegetables, like carrots, parsnips, root vegetables in general, and hard squash, are good additions, giving body to a blended soup without need of added flour.

As to cheese, I used a hearty smoked provolone In this version, but feel free to use your own taste or available ingredients to guide you…with a preference for medium soft cheeses that melt well.

Eatin’s Canada – April

ESSENCE:

  1. The intrinsic nature or indispensable quality of something, especially something abstract, which determines its character:
  2. An extract or concentrate obtained from a plant or other matter and used for flavouring or scent. (Oxford)

There may in some quarters be a debate about what is the most Canadian food, but here at Eatin’s Canada it is recognized that Maple Syrup is the essence of Canadian spring..and the most Canadian of foods.

This year, given the long and harsh winter, April is the month of the essence, when the warming of the weather allows the sap to run freely, filling buckets with pure liquid, almost like water, but ever so slightly sweet.  JP Campbell returns with part two of the sugarbush story.

Maple Syrup, The Essence of Spring, our feature Food for Thought article takes us from tapping, though the cooking process, to the final product. Later in the month, we’ll be featuring an article on another wonderful essence…Honey, but more on that when it arrives. When time permits, there will also be a follow-up and progress report on the seedlings.

Meanwhile, we have reviews and recipes for your reading and cooking pleasure:

Reviews: GaddAboutEating’s review of West Coast Seeds. For those that have not yet begun their gardens, as I did last month, there is still time to get seeds and start them indoors. Through the month, we’ll also be reviewing some other products and some events, watch for updates.

Recipes: In honour of the season, Gurpreet Chana has created a Canadian version of Gulab Jamun, an Indian classic dessert, using a maple based syrup, rather than a rosewater scented one. Lindiwe Sithole has provided a new Zimbabwean comfort food, Oxtail Stew, and Glen Synoground has returned with a delicious and tempting Crispy Szechuan Chicken recipe.

Before you go…don’t forget to sign up for our mailing list and get a FREE copy of our eCookbook, Easy Date Oven, with simple and delicious recipes for easy entertaining.

Free Cookbook Offer! Eatin's Canada - Easy Date Oven
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Eatin’s Canada – Easy Date Oven

Recipes

Frying Gulab Jamun
Frying Gulab Jamun

Recipes: In honour of the season, Gurpreet Chana has created aCanadian version of Gulab Jamun, an Indian classic dessert, using a maple based syrup, rather than a rosewater scented one.

 

 

oxtail02

 

Lindiwe Sithole has provided a new Zimbabwean comfort food, Oxtail Stew.

 

 

 

 

017Glen Synoground has returned with a delicious and tempting Crispy Szechuan Chicken recipe.

 

‘Pitmastery’

Article, recipe and main photo by Sean Galt, additional photography, Glen Synoground, voiceover by Lew Williams.

On alternate Fridays I load myself up in the car and begin the anywhere from 2 o 3 ½ hour drive toLondon where my 10 year old daughter lives with her mother.

RibsOne Friday, about 4 years ago the weather was terrible – cold, snowing and windy. On days like that I have a backup plan, which is to stay in London in a hotel where my daughter and I spend the weekend going to movies, eating out, attending concerts or sporting events.

That Saturday, we had dinner out at a mom and pop restaurant downtown. The special that night was BBQ baby back ribs. I ordered those with a salad and a pint of their house draft. My daughter ordered a grilled cheese sandwich and fries. I offered her a rib when the plate arrived. She looked at me with that quizzical expression a child gives you when they know you’re trying to give them medicine but you’re telling them it’s a gummy bear.

“I don’t think I’ll like those,” she said, taking a bite of her sandwich.

“Try one,” I said, “You won’t know till you taste it.”

“But just one. If I give it back, will that be ok?”

She took one bite and her eyes opened like she had tasted the food of the gods.

She ate the rack of ribs. I got the grilled cheese sandwich.

“Daddy, can you make those?” I honestly had no idea. Up to that point I was not a big fan of ribs, but for $9.99 with a salad, it was a good deal. I blame my mother. Her idea was to cut the racks into single pieces and boil them for at least 3 hours before covering them in spaghetti sauce and cooking them in the oven for another hour. I’m sure there was flavour there somewhere.

So when my daughter asked if I could do something, as a good dad, I took up the challenge, if only to see what I could do for my little girl and if i could cook more than burgers and chicken for her.

RibPasteGiven my past experiences with ribs, namely boiling and baking, it seemed to make sense to add flavour right to the meat and cook it into the flesh. Checking the grocery store, there was a variety of premade rib rubs and sauces, all seemed to have the same ingredients, and I thought about making my own rubs and marinades and testing what flavours complimented the meats well.

Some worked: curry/pineapple/apple was a hit; some didn’t: lemon/honey mustard. But it was fun every two weeks to drop two racks of ribs at dinner and ask, “Which is better, a or b?”

Usually we could tell by which rack was done first, but sometimes the runner up was deemed more creative and original. Then at the end of that summer, we went to the Oshawa Ribfest and we were introduced to a whole new beast: the smoked rib.

Flavors, layers, textures; I tried my best to decode everything I was tasting, only to ponder, “How on earth can I do this at home?”

I managed to catch the ear of a Pitmaster to compliment him on his product. When I asked him how I could do this, he said the four words I’ve since lived my life by when it comes to the BBQ:

Smoke.

Water.

Low.

Slow.

OnGrillI began pricing various BBQ’s and realized I didn’t have the money in the budget to purchase one of those gigantic smokers the Pitmaster used; nor did we have the space on the deck for one of those giant oil drum smokers. For a while we experimented with the gas grill, they were cooked. But gas vs wood is kind of like water vs wine. Sure, it’ll hydrate you, but the end result is just not the same.

Then one day my (then) partner said, “I think I found a smoker for you.” We headed over the next day. It was small, maybe room for 5 trimmed racks of ribs, or 3 whole chickens. It didn’t have an offset smoker box, so it meant only being able to utilize half the cooking space. But it would do the job. We plunked down the $150 and brought it You know that expression ‘you have to break a few eggs to make an omelette’? I had my own. ‘You gotta ruin some ribs to make a masterpiece.’

Rack after rack came off the grill dried out and flavorless. Shreds of pork peeled away like strips of jerkey. Everyone was polite. But I didn’t like them. Then one Saturday, I found the right combination of spices, water, smoke and temperature, and I discovered the secret ingredient.

Forget they’re there.

The problem was that I kept looking at them every few minutes, asking myself, “Is there enough smoke? Is there enough water? Are the coals burning in the right direction?” Every time I opened the lid, all that magic was being undone. Imagine biking up a hill, and you stop peddling every 20 seconds or so. remember how hard it was to get the bike going again. It was the same with the BBQ. The process had to start all over again.

So now I close the lid, go play with the kid, read a book, watch a movie, take the dog for a walk. Do anything but check on the food. It’s doing just fine on its own. That night at dinner, we had a hit.

Now that I had winner smoked ribs, it was time to fine tune the recipe. We’ve cooked dozens of ribs and countless other meals on this little smoker over the last three years. My daughter is more an active part of cooking now. We’ll go to the bulk store and she will pick out spices and mix them to see what the best flavour combinations will be.

Daddy/daughter time used to be in a movie theatre or restaurant. Now, it’s in our restaurant. And I think we’re ok with that.

The recipe is here.

InFoil

Glen Synoground

GlenSynogroundGlen is a senior management executive who brings originality and passion to his cooking.

Glen occasionally shares his original Tex-Mex recipes with us and is kind enough to allow access to his extensive portfolio of excellent food photographs when our writers are unable to provide their own images. We’re very pleased to have his support.

Sometimes classic, sometimes twisted, Glen’s photographs and descriptions stimulate the appetite.

He’s also a damnfine pool player.

Occasionally, he’ll grace us with an original recipe, but we’re pleased to have his photographs to illustrate the various recipes and articles here. To see all the recipes that Glen’s photos are associated with, please go to this link.