Tag Archives: Vegan

Related to vegans or veganism, regardless of whether it is a review, recipe, essay, listing, or interview.

November – Eatin’s Canada

Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup
Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup

November is the first of the truly cold months throughout The Great White North, and so it’s all about Bread and Soup for us here at Eatin’s Canada.  We’re featuring recipes for both, and a review about Enoteca Sociale,  in Toronto, along with an interview with Holger,  their Bread Baker and Pasta Maker, and a recipe for Enoteca Sociale’s Rosemary  Foccacia.

We have a Roasted Vegetable & Polenta Soup recipe from Glen Synoground, and many soup recipes from Bill Wimberly, beginning with his recipes for Basic Chicken Broth and Stock Variations about the differences between Broth and Stock.

Heart of Bread
We LOVE bread!

We also have recipes for some of my favourite bread recipes. One is from the Purity Flour Cookbook recipe for White Bread (with variations for 60% whole wheat), which was the first that I ever used when making my first loaves at the age of 10. This recipe was also featured in other popular flour company  cookbooks of the time. Also, Phyllis’s Bread, and Sunflower Bread from The Deaf Smith Country Cookbook, by Marjorie Winn Ford, Susan Hillyard, and Mary Faulk Koock, of Texas. A wonderful bread and a favourite cookbook…now sadly, out of print, but available online. Finally, we have instructions for Trapping and feeding Wild Sourdough Yeast.

Bill Wimberly in the army
Bill Wimberly in the army

A bit more about Bill Wimberly…he was a corporate chef, a good friend to me as a blogger,  and a wonderful and thoughtful man.

Sadly, we lost Bill  to Cancer shortly after this site was built, but it was created in part with him in mind.

Bill began cooking while in the service as a young man, and then went onto chef school to study formally on The GI Bill. When we first “met”  online in 2007, Bill was a semi-retired corporate chef and one of my best advisors in recipe development.  He is our patron saint, not unlike St. Vincent, and dearly missed.

We’ll post as many of his excellent recipes as possible.

Eatin’s Canada – November

Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup
Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup

November is the first of the truly cold months throughout The Great White North, and so it’s all about Bread and Soup for us here at Eatin’s Canada.  We’re featuring recipes for both, and a review about Enoteca Sociale,  in Toronto, along with an interview with Holger,  their Bread Baker and Pasta Maker, and a recipe for Enoteca Sociale’s Rosemary  Foccacia.

We have a Roasted Vegetable & Polenta Soup recipe from Glen Synoground, and many soup recipes from Bill Wimberly, beginning with his recipes for Basic Chicken Broth and Stock Variations about the differences between Broth and Stock.

Heart of Bread
We LOVE bread!

We also have recipes for some of my favourite bread recipes. One is from the Purity Flour Cookbook recipe for White Bread (with variations for 60% whole wheat), which was the first that I ever used when making my first loaves at the age of 10. This recipe was also featured in other popular flour company  cookbooks of the time. Also, Phyllis’s Bread, and Sunflower Bread from The Deaf Smith Country Cookbook, by Marjorie Winn Ford, Susan Hillyard, and Mary Faulk Koock, of Texas. A wonderful bread and a favourite cookbook…now sadly, out of print, but available online. Finally, we have instructions for Trapping and feeding Wild Sourdough Yeast.

Bill Wimberly in the army
Bill Wimberly in the army

A bit more about Bill Wimberly…he was a corporate chef, a good friend to me as a blogger,  and a wonderful and thoughtful man.

Sadly, we lost Bill  to Cancer shortly after this site was built, but it was created in part with him in mind.

Bill began cooking while in the service as a young man, and then went onto chef school to study formally on The GI Bill. When we first “met”  online in 2007, Bill was a semi-retired corporate chef and one of my best advisors in recipe development.  He is our patron saint, not unlike St. Vincent, and dearly missed.

We’ll post as many of his excellent recipes as possible.

Food Labeling, Politics, and Vegetarian Meats in Canada

Article and interview by Alison Cole, photo illustration by Gayle Hurmuses, image from Fieldroast.

When it comes to the labelling of grain and vegetable based meats in Canada, our government has some antiquated regulations that don’t reflect upon modern food production as David Lee, owner/founder of Field Roast Grain Meat Company of Seattle, WA, found out in mid-September.

Canadians have been enjoying and have been able to purchase Field Roast’s savoury array of plant-based sausages, loaves, roasts and deli slices in our country since 2009, but that is set to stop very soon as grocery store shelves are currently on the verge of selling out their final supplies.

Last month, David was told by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) that he would need to comply with Canadian food labeling standards for what they call “simulated meat products” in order to maintain distribution of all the products in Canada. According to the CFIA, any food item that takes on tFood Labeling Politics and Vegetarian Meats in Canadahe appearance and quality of a similar traditional animal flesh-based item must emulate the nutritional profile of the similar animal-based item. In other words, the nutritional profile of animal flesh is seen to be the standard in protein, fat and amino acid content as far as the Canadian government is concerned, and no other nutritional profiles that a plant-based meat would normally have are recognized as being valid or legal to sell on Canadian store shelves.

David takes issue with this regulation, and rather than comply with the CFIA as other vegan meat products have done to stay in Canada, he intends to try to work with the government to prove that the nutritional profile of his products is suitable and safe for Canadian consumers. In doing so, this may change the status quo of deeming animal protein to be the golden standard, and will pave the way for a modern update to Canada’s current food labeling laws for veggie meats, which can be seen here.

I had the chance to recently speak with David on the Animal Voices Vancouver radio show about this issue. In this interview, he speaks about his experiences with the CFIA’s recent declaration, his interpretation of the law, and his plans for proactive governmental changes in the future.

Sunflower Seeds ‘Hummus’

Article by Alison Cole, recipe by RawRose, used with permission.

As innocuous as it may seem, the little gray kernel of a beautiful yellow flower actually leads as a super food when it comes to boasting high nutritive values as well as being a convenient and tasty snack. That’s right, the sunflower seed is all that and deserves some attention when considering the addition of health benefits to one’s diet, packing in vitamins, protein, and more.

This gift from the sunflower is one of the first plants to be ever cultivated in the United States, and today the world’s leading suppliers of the sunflower seed include the Russian Federation, Peru, Argentina, Spain, France and China. Sunflower oil is one of the most popular oils in the world, and the seeds themselves are easily available and very affordable.

When examining the nutritional worth of the sunflower seed, it has many benefits to offer. Sunflower seeds provide an excellent source of vitamin E, which is the body’s principle fat soluble antioxidant. The seeds also provide linoleic acid (an essential fatty acid), and some amino acids, especially including tryptophan. Tryptophan aids in creating the neurotransmitter serotonin, which transmits nerve impulses to regulate mood, appetite and sleep and to improve memory and learning.

Sunflower seeds are also rich in phytosterols, which lower LDL cholesterol in the body, and several B vitamins. And if that weren’t enough, these powerhouse particles additionally provide an excellent source of fiber, as well as protein, with 7 grams of protein in a small ¼ cup serving. There are many reasons to eat these tasty morsels, nutrition-wise alone!

As with nuts and other seeds, because sunflower seeds are high in fat, they are prone to rancidity, so it is best to store the dehulled seeds in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They can also be stored in the freezer if you prefer. Whole seeds (with the shell) may be stored at room temperature in a container, without the risk of going rancid.

The most simple (and perhaps enjoyable) way to eat sunflower seeds is straight from the package, whether you are dehulling them in your mouth or have purchased the seeds already without shells. You can also garnish your salads and cereals with them, or use them in recipes to make delightful desserts, dips and pâtés.

Try out this yummy hummus recipe by RawRose, which features sunflower seeds as one of its main ingredients. You can also listen to it, if you find that helpful. Voiceover by Lew Williams.

Sadza/Isitshwala

Sadza is the Zimbabwean staple food. It is also a staple food in southern and east Africa. It is the same as ugali in Kenya, nsima in Malawi, fufu in Nigeria and papa in South Africa. Different types of meal can be used to make sadza/ isitshwala. Among these are: maize (corn) meal, sorghum meal and ground rice. Maize meal seems to be the most popular of these. This is a meal that most households will eat on daily basis and it is a rich source of carbohydrates. Serve with Curried Kale and Lindiwe’s Beef Stew.