Tag Archives: Vegetarian

November – Eatin’s Canada

Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup
Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup

November is the first of the truly cold months throughout The Great White North, and so it’s all about Bread and Soup for us here at Eatin’s Canada.  We’re featuring recipes for both, and a review about Enoteca Sociale,  in Toronto, along with an interview with Holger,  their Bread Baker and Pasta Maker, and a recipe for Enoteca Sociale’s Rosemary  Foccacia.

We have a Roasted Vegetable & Polenta Soup recipe from Glen Synoground, and many soup recipes from Bill Wimberly, beginning with his recipes for Basic Chicken Broth and Stock Variations about the differences between Broth and Stock.

Heart of Bread
We LOVE bread!

We also have recipes for some of my favourite bread recipes. One is from the Purity Flour Cookbook recipe for White Bread (with variations for 60% whole wheat), which was the first that I ever used when making my first loaves at the age of 10. This recipe was also featured in other popular flour company  cookbooks of the time. Also, Phyllis’s Bread, and Sunflower Bread from The Deaf Smith Country Cookbook, by Marjorie Winn Ford, Susan Hillyard, and Mary Faulk Koock, of Texas. A wonderful bread and a favourite cookbook…now sadly, out of print, but available online. Finally, we have instructions for Trapping and feeding Wild Sourdough Yeast.

Bill Wimberly in the army
Bill Wimberly in the army

A bit more about Bill Wimberly…he was a corporate chef, a good friend to me as a blogger,  and a wonderful and thoughtful man.

Sadly, we lost Bill  to Cancer shortly after this site was built, but it was created in part with him in mind.

Bill began cooking while in the service as a young man, and then went onto chef school to study formally on The GI Bill. When we first “met”  online in 2007, Bill was a semi-retired corporate chef and one of my best advisors in recipe development.  He is our patron saint, not unlike St. Vincent, and dearly missed.

We’ll post as many of his excellent recipes as possible.

Eatin’s Canada – November

Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup
Roasted Vegetables and Polenta Soup

November is the first of the truly cold months throughout The Great White North, and so it’s all about Bread and Soup for us here at Eatin’s Canada.  We’re featuring recipes for both, and a review about Enoteca Sociale,  in Toronto, along with an interview with Holger,  their Bread Baker and Pasta Maker, and a recipe for Enoteca Sociale’s Rosemary  Foccacia.

We have a Roasted Vegetable & Polenta Soup recipe from Glen Synoground, and many soup recipes from Bill Wimberly, beginning with his recipes for Basic Chicken Broth and Stock Variations about the differences between Broth and Stock.

Heart of Bread
We LOVE bread!

We also have recipes for some of my favourite bread recipes. One is from the Purity Flour Cookbook recipe for White Bread (with variations for 60% whole wheat), which was the first that I ever used when making my first loaves at the age of 10. This recipe was also featured in other popular flour company  cookbooks of the time. Also, Phyllis’s Bread, and Sunflower Bread from The Deaf Smith Country Cookbook, by Marjorie Winn Ford, Susan Hillyard, and Mary Faulk Koock, of Texas. A wonderful bread and a favourite cookbook…now sadly, out of print, but available online. Finally, we have instructions for Trapping and feeding Wild Sourdough Yeast.

Bill Wimberly in the army
Bill Wimberly in the army

A bit more about Bill Wimberly…he was a corporate chef, a good friend to me as a blogger,  and a wonderful and thoughtful man.

Sadly, we lost Bill  to Cancer shortly after this site was built, but it was created in part with him in mind.

Bill began cooking while in the service as a young man, and then went onto chef school to study formally on The GI Bill. When we first “met”  online in 2007, Bill was a semi-retired corporate chef and one of my best advisors in recipe development.  He is our patron saint, not unlike St. Vincent, and dearly missed.

We’ll post as many of his excellent recipes as possible.

Roasted Vegetable and Polenta Soup

Recipe and photographs by Glen Synoground

RawVeggiesThe types of vegetables you use, and their relative amounts are variable, and can be based on the vegetables you have available, and want to use. What matters is that you have more or less 5 cups of mixed vegetables to begin with.

Starting with onions and garlic is always a good place, and certain types of vegetables, like carrots, parsnips, root vegetables in general, and hard squash, are good additions, giving body to a blended soup without need of added flour.

As to cheese, I used a hearty smoked provolone In this version, but feel free to use your own taste or available ingredients to guide you…with a preference for medium soft cheeses that melt well.

Food Labeling, Politics, and Vegetarian Meats in Canada

Article and interview by Alison Cole, photo illustration by Gayle Hurmuses, image from Fieldroast.

When it comes to the labelling of grain and vegetable based meats in Canada, our government has some antiquated regulations that don’t reflect upon modern food production as David Lee, owner/founder of Field Roast Grain Meat Company of Seattle, WA, found out in mid-September.

Canadians have been enjoying and have been able to purchase Field Roast’s savoury array of plant-based sausages, loaves, roasts and deli slices in our country since 2009, but that is set to stop very soon as grocery store shelves are currently on the verge of selling out their final supplies.

Last month, David was told by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) that he would need to comply with Canadian food labeling standards for what they call “simulated meat products” in order to maintain distribution of all the products in Canada. According to the CFIA, any food item that takes on tFood Labeling Politics and Vegetarian Meats in Canadahe appearance and quality of a similar traditional animal flesh-based item must emulate the nutritional profile of the similar animal-based item. In other words, the nutritional profile of animal flesh is seen to be the standard in protein, fat and amino acid content as far as the Canadian government is concerned, and no other nutritional profiles that a plant-based meat would normally have are recognized as being valid or legal to sell on Canadian store shelves.

David takes issue with this regulation, and rather than comply with the CFIA as other vegan meat products have done to stay in Canada, he intends to try to work with the government to prove that the nutritional profile of his products is suitable and safe for Canadian consumers. In doing so, this may change the status quo of deeming animal protein to be the golden standard, and will pave the way for a modern update to Canada’s current food labeling laws for veggie meats, which can be seen here.

I had the chance to recently speak with David on the Animal Voices Vancouver radio show about this issue. In this interview, he speaks about his experiences with the CFIA’s recent declaration, his interpretation of the law, and his plans for proactive governmental changes in the future.

Dolmathes with Avgolemono

Article and recipe by Gayle Hurmuses, photographs by Gisela McKay.IMG_8130

Dolmathes are one of those things (like sushi) which look more difficult than they truly are.

Take a platter of these to a party to look like a hero, and if you are using your own grapes,  cut a length of vine to use as decoration for the tray.

I love making Dolmathes for the meditative qualities of the process. A mildly fussy series of simple tasks, that when complete lead to a sense of esthetic pleasure…at least for me.

There are commercially available preserved grape leaves and those are perfectly fine…but I am fortunate to have a grape vine in the garden and  enjoy choosing the leaves right  before making the wraps.

If made without meat, these are vegetarian and if served without the Avgolemono sauce, they are also vegan.  For vegetarians make the sauce with either water or a vegetable stock.

My family recipe uses currants and raisins, which I have exchanged for cranberries…because Canada.

If made with meat,  dolmathes are most commonly made with lamb…or possibly goat.